The Effect of Organic Treatments on Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus)

Preamble

An experiment was conducted at the Model Organic Farm of CSK Himachal Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur (31º54’ N and 76º17’ E), Himachal Pradesh, India, to evaluate the effect of various organic management treatments on the productivity and quality of lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus). Organic inputs (viz. farm yard manure (FYM); vermicompost; agnihotra ash; and neem powder) were added at the time of planting, while Bt + Himbio and the biodynamic preparation BD 500 were sprayed regularly at one month intervals. Crops were sown on dates matching moon and non moon position according to the Biodynamic Planting Calendar. Addition of agnihotra ash along with sowing as per moon position resulted in a higher yield of lemongrass (+124%, +99%) and a higher oil per cent (+155%, +144%) over the control, in both the years of study. Sowing as per moon position may have improved germination rate, water absorption and metabolism of the plants, whereas addition of agnihotra ash may have stabilized the nutrients present in soil.
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Biochemical Efficacy of Homa Organic Farming Practices in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus)

An investigation was carried out at Main Agricultural Research station, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, Karnataka during monsoon season 2012, to study response of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus var. Arka Anamika L. Moench) to Homa Organic Farming practices.

Preamble

A field experiment laid out in completely randomised block design with 18 treatments replicated thrice was conducted during monsoon season 2012 to study the biochemical efficacy of Homa organic farming practices in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus var. Arka Anamika).

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Biochemical Efficacy of Homa Organic Farming Practices in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus var. Arka Anamika L. Moench)

An investigation was carried out at Main Agricultural Research station, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, Karnataka during monsoon season 2012, to study response of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus var. Arka Anamika L. Moench) to Homa Organic Farming practices.

Preamble

A field experiment laid out in completely randomised block design with 18 treatments replicated thrice was conducted during monsoon season 2012 to study the biochemical efficacy of Homa organic farming practices in okra (Abelmoschus esculentus var. Arka Anamika).

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Biochemical Studies on Homa Organic Farming Practices in Cabbage

An investigation was carried out at Main Agricultural Research station, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, Karnataka during monsoon season 2010, to study response of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. Saint) to Homa Organic Farming practices.

Preamble

A field experiment laid out in Completely Randomised Block Design with 13 treatments replicated thrice was conducted during monsoon 2010 to study the biochemical studies on Homa organic farming practices in cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. Saint).
The present investigation was therefore, carried out with the following objectives:
To study the effect of Homa organic farming on:

  1. Growth and yield and quality of cabbage.
  2. Soil fertility and soil biological activity in the rhizosphere.
  3. Pest and disease management of cabbage.

General view of cabbage field in C-block (Homa)

General view of cabbage field in G-block (Control) Continue reading “Biochemical Studies on Homa Organic Farming Practices in Cabbage”

Response of Tomato to Homa Organic Farming Practices

An investigation was carried out at Main Agricultural Research station, University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, Karnataka during kharif season 2010, to study response of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) to Homa Organic Farming practices.

Preamble

The field experiment was laid out in completely randomised block design with 11 treatments exposed to Homa atmosphere replicated thrice.
Objectives of Investigation:
To study the effect of Homa organic farming practices on:

  1. The growth, yield and quality of tomato.
  2. Chemical properties of soil and soil fertility.
  3. Beneficial organisms and biological activity in rhizosphere soil.
  4. The pest and disease management of tomato.
The conventional control (CC) and control without Homa (CWH) were maintained almost 1 km away. The soil type was sandy loamy. All the seedlings were grown on raised beds, transplanted after one month and were given fresh cow dung and cow urine as basal treatment except absolute control, CC and CWC. Non-homa ash was collected after burning the agricultural waste. Agnihotra homa (AH) was performed at sun rise and sun set and Om Tryambakam homa (OTH) was performed for 3-4 h daily during experimental period which yielded smoke and ash. A special bio-digester called Gloria Biosol was prepared which contained AH ash. The Non-homa ash, AH ash, OTH ash and Gloria Biosol were used for soil and foliar application.

Discussion

Soil and foliar application of Gloria Biosol was significantly superior over organic control in plant height, number leaves, number of branches, root length, yield attributes, microbial population in the soil, increase in the activities of soil dehydrogenase (5- 52%) and soil phosphatase (2-34%), soil N and K and micronutrients, Cu and Mn and quality parameters like lycopene (40.69%), phenol (7.28%), ascorbic acid (49.05%), TSS (10.2%) and total sugar (9.68%) showed significant increase. Soil and foliar application of AH ash increased soil phosphorus and micronutrients, Zn and Fe. Shelf life of tomato fruits increased by 7-12 days due to different homa treatments as compared to organic and conventional control. Incidence of Leaf spot and insect attack was reduced significantly (37.2% – 40.17%, respectively) due to soil and foliar application of Gloria Biosol which was superior over homa ashes and control.

Summary and Conclusion

  • Morphological characters like plant height, number of branches, number of leaves were enhanced due to different homa treatments as compared to organic control.
  • The tomato yield (kg/ha) registered 43 per cent increase as compared to organic control due to soil and foliar application of a special bio-digester called Gloria Biosol.
  • Soil and foliar application of Gloria Biosol increased soil macronutrients (N -74 % and K-31 %) and micronutrients (Cu – 28 % and Mn – 29 %) as compared to organic control.
  • The soil and foliar application of Agnihotra homa ash increased soil P by 40 per cent and soil Zn and Fe content by about 15 per cent each as compared to organic control.
  • The soil and foliar application of Biosol registered increase in the population of bacteria, fungi and Actinomycetes by 18, 48, and 47 per cent, respectively.
  • Increase in the activities of soil dehydrogenase (5-52 %) and phosphatase (2- 34 %) due to different homa treatments as compared with organic control was observed.
  • Increase in quality parameters like ascorbic acid (49%), lycopene (40%), phenols (7%) and TSS (10%) was found due to soil and foliar application of Gloria Biosol as compared to organic control.
  • Decrease in the incidence of leaf spot (37%) and insect attack (40%) was observed as compared with Gloria Biosol and organic control due to different homa treatments.
  • Soil and foliar application of Gloria Biosol was more effective than its foliar application alone in improving growth and yield parameters like soil biological activity, macro and
    micronutrients like N, K, Cu, Mn and quality parameters like ascorbic acid, lycopene, phenols, total sugars and TSS.
  • Soil and foliar application of Agnihotra homa ash was effective in increasing shelf life of the tomato fruits by 7-12 days.

It may be concluded from the present study that Homa organic farming practices not only heal the atmosphere by lowering pest and disease attack but also take care of health of the soil, plants and their produce.

Thesis details

BRUNDA R. (Author)
M.Sc (Agri) (Degree)
Plant Biochemistry (Department)
University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad (Institute)
AC, Dharwad-580005 Karnataka State, India (Place)
2011 (Year submitted)
Th10206 (Accession No)
University Library, UAS, Dharwad
Dr. P.W. BASARKAR (Major Advisor)
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